[seqfan] Re: superbirthdays

Robert Munafo mrob27 at gmail.com
Sun Jan 16 05:33:44 CET 2011


There are more than 4 patterns, depending on how old you are in a year (like
1900 or 2100) that is a multiple of 100 without also being a multiple of
400.

The ages 28, 56 and 84 (if you are lucky) have worked for everyone who has
lived in recent memory but soon will no longer apply to newly born people.

On Sat, Jan 15, 2011 at 20:06, N. J. A. Sloane <njas at research.att.com>wrote:

> Dear Seq Fans,
> Could someone volunteer to work out these 4 sequences and submit them?
> (someone who hasn't anwered one of these requests in the past 30 days)
>
>                         Neil
>
> >On Thu, Jan 13, 2011 at 9:30 AM, Eric Angelini <Eric.Angelini at kntv.be>
> wrote:
> >>
> >> I was born on Wednesday, September 12, 1951.
> >> My next "Wednesday, September 12" birthday
> >> (or super-birthday) was in 1956 together with
> >> my (ordinary) 5th birthday. Due to leap years,
> >> my personal sequence of super-birthdays is:
> >> S = 0,5,11,22,28,33,39,50,56,...
> >> Is it true that only 4 different such sequences
> >> exist (depending if you are born one year before
> >> a leap year, a leap year, one year after a leap
> >> year, two years after a leap year)?
> >> Is it true that, whatever their birth year is,
> >> all humans have a super-birthday which matches
> >> their regular 28th birthday?
> >>
> >> [This comes from a nice little book by
> >>  Alexandre Moatti: http://goo.gl/vB9r6]
>
>
-- 
  Robert Munafo  --  mrob.com
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